WW3 Showdown: US Attacking Russia, Things About To Explode

WW3 Showdown: US Attacking Russia, Things About To Explode

The United States has dubbed Russia a world threat despite ongoing talks and cooperation over efforts in Syria. Based on recent turn of events, a number of analysts suggest that the United States seems obsessed with Russia, that it finds every possible way to paint the country negatively.


US Targeting Russia

When analyzing how the media has been treating Russia, it appears that it always finds a way to portray the country in a negative light. There has been an ongoing propaganda against Russia, according to a number of analysts. Some argue that the propaganda is mostly because of the West’s military insecurity.

“As to identifying a source of the West’s motivation for this continuum of impugning Soviet Union, aka Russia, there is only one answer: America’s military industrial insecurity complex,” noted Pravda. The report argued that people should probably look for alternative news sources if they hear the mainstream media cry wolf over Russia.

As it notes: “Yes; the entire western hemisphere is infected. Their disease is incurable.”

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Also Read: NATO Gives Go Signal To Attack Russia

Central Asia Concerns

Another report from Russia Beyond the Headlines argues that the United States would do well not to compete with Russia, including in Central Asia. Instead, the West should strive not to turn the region into an area of competition, but rather a venue for cooperation.

While Europe has been at the forefront of NATO’s and West’s concerns, Central Asia can potentially become a point of concern for the same parties. Moscow has been keeping an eye for progress in Central Asia, especially since instability in the region could also put it at risk, with terrorists possibly infiltrating the porous borders of Afghanistan.

“Keep in mind that Afghanistan borders former Soviet republics, which are going through a very difficult period of time: We don’t actually know what is happening there beneath the surface [in Central Asia],” said Dmitri Trenin, the director of the Carnegie Moscow Center.

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