WW3 Panic As Sonic Booms Heard In UK Town

WW3 Panic As Sonic Booms Heard In UK Town

Panic and confusion ensued when two loud sonic booms emanate from two scrambling RAF typhoon jets, which had to rush and escort an unresponsive commercial flight to land. Sonic booms are generated when a jet takes off at a speed of 767mph an above.


Curious and worried residents of Doncaster and Yorkshire had no idea what’s happening when they heard the unusually loud sound from two fighter jets taking off at the Lincolnshire’s RAF Coningsby, the Doncaster Free Press reported.

It all began when a commercial flight of Air France AF 1558 bound for New Castle from Paris lost radio contact with the air traffic controller as it approaches its destination Monday evening. The incident prompted the deployment of two fighter jets to bring the plane in ground safely.

But while the whole incident was unfolding, the passengers aboard the flight had no idea what exactly was happening at the moment, not until they landed safely at their destination.

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In a separate report from the Mirror, clueless residents in most parts of northern England who have heard the massive sonic boom, thought the disturbing sound came from the massive explosions. Some even took to social media to share what they have just heard.

Later that day, a spokesperson for RAF confirmed in a tweet that the loud sound came from two of its Typhoon jets, which were sent to escort the unresponsive plane.

“Quick reaction alert Typhoon aircraft were launched from RAF Coningsby to identify unresponsive civilian plane. Communications were re-established and the aircraft has been safely landed,” the spokesperson for RAF was quoted as saying by the Mirror.

Meanwhile, it wasn’t clear why the AF 1558 lost contact with the air control traffic as of this writing. Authorities are still conducting an investigation to determine the cause of the glitch.

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