Windows 3.1 Is Back From The Grave; Allows You To Play 1000 Games From The 90s

Windows 3.1 Is Back From The Grave; Allows You To Play 1000 Games From The 90s
Solitaire Daniel Oines/Flickr CC BY 2.0
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The return of Windows 3.1 reminds me of the saying, “Old Is Gold.” Today, even when we are constantly introduced to changes in technology, we refrain from adopting the new and latest. Take Windows 10 for example. Even after offering the best operating system of today’s time for free, Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 users are not ready to switch.


For people who have been missing their 24-year old operating system, Windows 3.1, here comes the good news. As reported by Motherboard, “Using the open-source DOS emulator DOSBox, Internet Archive’s Jason Scott put together a Windows 3.x Showcase, including over 1000 pieces of early 90s software from both Windows 3.0 and Windows 3.1x. You can play around with the software right in your browser, no download required.” Isn’t that a great news?

If you decide to get Windows 3.1, here are the classic Windows games that you will be able to play in 2016. Here is the list of games:

  2. Monopoly Deluxe
  3. Wheel of Fortune
  4. JezzBall
  5. Solitaire
  6. Brick Breaker II Turbo
  7. Risk
  8. Boxworld
  9. Rattler Race
  10. Glider 4.0 for Windows
  11. Abalone
  12. Combat Tanks
  13. Shanghai 2 – Dragon’s Eye
  14. Pool
  16. Checkers
  17. Drain Storm
  18. Bubble Trouble
  19. Bricks 3
  20. Office Darts 301

Back then, when there were no apps and spending hours on the internet was unheard of, computer games were the only entertainment people had. Windows Games is the first thing that comes to mind when we speak about Windows 3.1.

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When asked about Windows 3.1, mastermind Jason Scott of Internet Archive said, “The Windows shell started to become more and more like an operating system, and the introduction of Windows 3.0 and 3.1 brought stability, flexibility, and ease-of-programming to a very wide audience, and cemented the still-dominant desktop paradigms in use today.”

Are you excited to go back to Windows 3.1 days and play games like Bricks and Solitaire once again? As your kids teach you about modern technology, how about you teach them about the technology that was used during your time? A role reversal would be good, for a change.