US Depot Explosion In Japan And Tianjin Explosion Connected? Similarities Of The Two Blasts

US Depot Explosion In Japan And Tianjin Explosion Connected? Similarities Of The Two Blasts
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Japan is rocked by multiple explosions that happened at a U.S. military facility seconds after clock struck midnight on Monday. The series of explosions happened at Sagamihara, General Depot, a U.S. army outpost in Kanagawa Prefecture, on the outskirts of Tokyo.


The explosions happen just within weeks after a huge blast rocked the port city of Tianjin in China. Morning News USA observed that there are similarities about the two separate explosions. These similarities may be or may not be coincidence but nothing is really known at this point.

Toxic materials in a warehouse

According to a report from Reuters, the local fire department in Japan received a call within minutes after midnight. The call reported an explosion at the U.S. military depot. Whoever placed the call said that the depot has “dangerous material” in stored. News Executive also reported of unverified information that the site of explosion is an ammunition depot.

As previously reported by Morning News USA, there were initial fears of a nuclear bomb regarding the Tianjin huge explosion. Succeeding reports had authorities confirming that the one responsible for the blast is a warehouse that store toxic chemicals.

Read: Tianjin Huge Explosion: Fears Of Nuclear Bomb Over Mushroom Cloud

Both explosions happened while everyone is asleep

According to a report from RT, local residents close by the U.S. military depot were woken up by the explosions.

“I was asleep, and at first thought it might have been the roar of thunder, but then there was a sequence of explosions for 10, maybe 15 minutes. A pillar of orange rose to the skies, and the air was filled with the smell of gunpowder,” one witness was quoted as saying by RT, citing NHK.

A video of the Tianjin explosion previously reported by Morning News USA had this conversation between two Chinese residents:

Person 1: Wow! Everything is shaking. Is it a nuclear bomb!? The windows on the building have shattered.

Person 1: The explosion is so violent. I hope our building doesn’t collapse.

Person 2: Put your clothes on. Let’s hope our building doesn’t collapse.

Read: Rainwater Toxic, Mysterious Foam In Tianjin Has Burning Sensation

Conspiracy Theories

In an interview with UK’s Mirror, Michael Penn, a Japanese terrorist expert and who heads the Shingetsu News, said that “it’s plausible” that the explosion at the U.S. military depot was something “deliberate.”

Penn told Mirror that the military depot that exploded is just a part of a sprawling three-part complex. One of these three parts is Camp Zama which was suspected as the site where activists “deliberately started three explosions.”

“At least 10 fire engines were called to the scene and it seems like military guards called them. It is a deserted area and the question is how the fire was started. Something obviously blew it up,” Penn said further.

RT reported that the depot also housed a former WWII-era tank plant and arsenal, the 35th Combat Sustainment Support Battalion and other logistics and medical departments necessary in overseeing the U.S. military network in Sagamihara.

Morning News USA previously reported that there is a conspiracy theory swirling that the Tianjin huge explosion is a covert attack from the Pentagon. The attack is said to be launched from space using the “Rod of God.”

Read: China-US War Erupts! Tianjin Explosion An Attack From Pentagon, US Taught China A Lesson – Report

Authorities downplaying the explosion

A statement made by U.S. Navy Commander Bill Urban said that there were no reports of injury and the “base firefighters and first responders are currently fighting the resulting fire to prevent its spread to nearby buildings.” From this, it could be inferred that investigations are still ongoing.

In another statement by U.S. Army spokesman Lieutenant Colonel Kevin Toner, the possibility of hazardous material was already dismissed but added that authorities are still in the process of identifying the contents of the depot.

“The building that exploded was not a hazardous material storage facility. We are in the process of determining the contents of the building. The depot does not store ammunition or radiological materials,” Toner told Reuters in an emailed statement.

Just within days after the Tianjin explosion, there had already been media censorship. A United Nations human rights official had even call for the Chinese government to observe transparency in its investigation.

Read: Tianjin News Update: Transparency Sought From Chinese Officials

Read: Nuclear Experts Investigate Huge Tianjin Explosion; Media Censorship In Place