There’s Hidden Life Underneath Antarctic Ice

There’s Hidden Life Underneath Antarctic Ice
Decepción Ansilta Grizas / Flickr CC

For the very first time in the history of science, researchers have discovered a hidden lake in the Antarctic region believed to harbor unique life forms isolated for million of years.


This was revealed during the recent meeting of the European Geosciences Union in Vienna earlier this week. Although the newly discovered lake is much smaller in size than Lake Vostok, which has an area of 240 by 60 kilometers, this new lake may hold vital data to the scientific community.

Martin Siegert of the Imperial College of London told the New Scientist that the new lake, which has an estimated area of 10 by 100 kilometers, is nearer the research station. This, according to him, makes it easier for researchers all over the world to study the subglacial lake.

“We’ve seen these strange, linear channels on the surface, and are inferring these are above massive, 1000-kilometre-long channels, and there’s a relatively large subglacial lake there too,” Siegert was quoted as saying by the New Scientist.

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According to the same report, the hidden lake is the last unexplored and unstudied spot in the Antarctic region, which may hold important data on subglacial lakes of the world. One of the things the researchers are interested in finding out is whether the lake supports life forms and biology.

In fact, researchers from the U.S. and China are also flying into the area to collaborate on the study, which may commence on May. Since it’s closer to the research base, researchers are confident that they might be able to gather more information about the lake than other previously discovered lake systems in the region, which are remotely located.

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