Suspicious Death Of Dog After Crufts Prompts Investigation

Suspicious Death Of Dog After Crufts Prompts Investigation
Image from Flickr by wzwjon
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Crufts 2007 wzwjon Suspicious Death Of Dog After Crufts Prompts Investigation
Image from Flickr by wzwjon

A canine competitor has died the day after taking part in Crufts, one of the most significant dog shows in the world. The death has prompted investigations after the autopsy has revealed that Irish setter Thendara Satisfaction was poisoned.


According to CNN, Jagger, as the dog is known to his owners, won second prize in his class during the competition held in Birmingham, England on Thursday. Upon returning to Belgium a day later, he fell ill and found it difficult to breathe. Jagger died before reaching a veterinarian.

Poisoned Beef Cubes

“The vet thought it was suspicious, so carried out an autopsy,” owner and breeder Dee Millington-Bott told CNN. “They found cubes of beef in his stomach that had at least two types of poison inside. Pieces of beef had been stitched together so that the poison didn’t come out.”

The death has already been reported to Belgian police, with Millington-Bott planning to contact the UK’s West Midlands Police as well.

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“We are deeply shocked and saddened to hear this terrible news and our heartfelt sympathies go out to Jagger’s owners,” said Caroline Kisko, secretary of Kennel Club, which organizes Crufts, said in a statement.

Kisko added that since 1891, there had never been an incident like Jagger’s.

Controversy at Crufts

The Guardian has cited a number of controversies that have affected the renowned dog show, including alleged slipping of “laxatives into food or chewing gum into the fur of a prettily primped rival.”

Other dog owners seemed to have fallen victim to paranoia after news of the Irish setter’s death began to circulate. One of whom is Sue Smith, a 30-year Crufts competitor with a Pomeranian who won first in its class.

“If it turns out to be true, then things have gone too far,” Smith said. “I take no chances. I am just wary. I don’t trust anybody.”