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Smokers More Likely To Be Jobless Than Non Smokers, Study Shows

Smokers More Likely To Be Jobless Than Non Smokers, Study Shows
Smoker Roman Pavlyuk / Flickr CC BY 2.0

Health

Smokers More Likely To Be Jobless Than Non Smokers, Study Shows

Are you a smoker and jobless? You might want to quit smoking for now, as a team of researchers from Stanford University School of Medicine claims in a study that smokers are more likely to be unemployed than their non-smoking peers.

Are you a smoker and jobless? You might want to quit smoking for now, as a team of researchers from Stanford University School of Medicine claims in a study that smokers are more likely to be unemployed than their non-smoking peers.

Apart from potentially being unemployed relatively longer than non-smokers, those who smoke appear to be paid less than those who don’t smoke. The study, which was published in JAMA journal of Internal Medicine, reconfirmed results of previous studies both in Europe and in the United States with regards to the relationship of smoking behavior to employment.

In order to establish whether smoking behavior does affect a person’s employability, the research team, headed by Dr. Judith Prochaska, monitored smokers and non-smokers research participants for 12 months. Before the 12-month duration of the study, all participants, 131 smokers and 120 non-smokers, were all unemployed in order to establish a baseline for the study.

After a year, the team found that smokers have a harder time finding a job than their non-smoking peers. Proschaska’s team later found that only 3 out of ten of the smoker participants found a job at the end of the 12-month period, while almost 6 out of 10 of the non-smoking participants have found a job after the same period.

Interestingly, non-smokers who later found a job after the 12-month period receive an average of $5 per hour above the smokers’ pay. This suggests that apart from having a hard time finding a job, smokers also are paid relatively less than their non-smoking peers.

The research, however, failed to establish whether smoking behavior is a cause or effect of unemployment or if it’s the other way around.

“You don’t know if smokers have a harder time finding work or if smokers are more likely to lose their jobs — or that when nonsmokers lose their jobs, they become stressed and start to smoke,” Prochaska said in the university press release.

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About Jereco Paloma

Jereco is a registered psychometrician by profession and a practicing psychotrauma therapist who writes for a living. He has been writing for different news organizations in the past six years. Follow him for the freshest news on Health and Science, the US Elections, and World Politics.

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