Real Life ‘Good Will Hunting:’ Migrant Worker Solves Complex Math Problems

Real Life ‘Good Will Hunting:’ Migrant Worker Solves Complex Math Problems
Feynman diagram Brennan / Flickr CC BY-ND 2.0

For most people, math is not fun pastime, but a Chinese man working at a logistic firm finds comfort solving complex mathematical problems during his downtime, earning him the title of the real-life Good Will Hunting.


Yu Jianchun, 33, working at a local logistics firm in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, is currently doing the rounds online after he came up with five formulas for the Carmichael number, which is described by mathematicians as “pseudo-prime numbers.”

Yu, who had no formal training in mathematics such as advance calculus, came up with the formulas during his spare time at the shop. He said he developed is interest in numbers by choice and by constant practice, CNN reported.

Cai Tianxin, a Zhenjiang University mathematician Yu collaborated with for the past eight years, described Yu’s formulas as “imaginative.” Aside from the fact that Yu had no formal training in mathematics, he was also able to come up with completely different formulas from the traditional algorithm.

Like us on Facebook

According to a report from, Yu presented his formulas with PhD students at the Zhejiang University, then said he developed the formulas through intuition. Mathematicians at the university described his formulas as “efficient” in identifying Carmichael numbers.

“I made my discoveries through intuition. I would write down what I thought when inspirations struck about the Carmichael. I have hard work and make a hard living, but I insist on my studies,” Yu was quoted as saying by

The film Good Will Hunting is a story of a janitor working at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) who has a genius-level IQ. Hunting solves difficult mathematical problems, later discovered by mathematics professor who then helps him achieve his full potential.

Also Read: 300-year-old Math Problem Finally Solved!

Want to get updated with the latest Science stories? Subscribe to our newsletter or follow us on Twitter and Facebook.