‘Parks and Recreation’ Airs Bittersweet Series Finale

‘Parks and Recreation’ Airs Bittersweet Series Finale
Image from Flickr by Geoffrey Fairchild
NBC Geoffrey Fairchild Parks and Recreation Airs Bittersweet Series Finale
Image from Flickr by Geoffrey Fairchild

On Feb 24, NBC’s hit comedy “Parks and Recreation” bids farewell with an hour-long series finale written by the show’s star Amy Poehler herself. For seven seasons, the comedy series has garnered a loyal fanbase, pleasing audience and critics alike, enough to win Poehler a Golden Globe Award for Best Actress in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy.


A Glimpse into the Future

The final episode wisely employs a plot technique called the flash-forward, made famous by the ABC show “Lost” in multiple episodes. Audiences are allowed to get a glimpse of various beloved “Parks” characters as far as the year 2048. TIME notes that before each flash-forward begins, Leslie Knope (Poehler) is seen hugging, patting, and touching that specific character.

The season finale, entitled “One Last Ride,” is considered by critics and TV reviewers as an effective swan song capturing Leslie’s acquired relationships over the course of events that occurred in the TV series.

The Washington Post enumerates multiple reasons the show lasted for several seasons, the most obvious being NBC’s lack of comedy shows, with the said network renewing “Parks” for the same reason it did with “The Office” and “30 Rock,” both of which had attracted younger viewers and earned countless awards.

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In Memoriam

Viewers felt sad not only for the departure of “Parks.” It should be remembered that Harris Wittels, the show’s co-executive producer, passed away on Feb 19 due to apparent overdose.

Entertainment Weekly writes about cast member Jim O’Heir, who dearly remembers Wittels as a friend and a colleague.

“He made you laugh and was generous with his own laughter. He was so damn quick—it’s just so rare to see that kind of talent. It was no secret that Harris had battled addiction,” O’Heir said.

“He was very vocal about his struggle and I remember him talking about it during a standup set. We’ve lost a great mind and, more importantly, a great person.”