Paris Attacks: How Carnage Unfolded

Paris Attacks: How Carnage Unfolded

The Paris attacks unfolded in a little over half an hour. The first attack happened shortly before 9:30 p.m. as two bombers set off their suicide vests at a stadium.


Not more than 60 seconds later, gunmen riding in a black car drove around Paris, shooting people at a bar and restaurants. At 9:40 p.m., a car arrived at the Bataclan concert hall. Three men entered and instantly killed 89 people. At 9:53 p.m. another suicide bomber set his vest off.

Paris Prosecutor Francois Molins said the Paris attacks were well-coordinated. The seven attackers wore similar vests filled with batteries and a detonator, and were carrying a triacetone triperoxide charge or most commonly known as acetone peroxide, an explosive also used during the London bombings of 2005. The men were also carrying semi-automatic rifles, France 24 reported. On Sunday, AK47 rifles were found in a suburb six kilometers east of the French capital.

Morning News USA reported that a Syrian passport was found near one of the suicide bombers. Molins confirmed this report. Sources familiar with the investigation who have spoken with CNN identified four of the suspects, three of whom were dead: Bilal Hadfi, a resident in Belgium; Ahmad al Muhammad, the one with the passport; Ismael Omar Mostefai, a resident of Chartres, France; and Salah Abdeslam, still on the loose and identified as a Belgian-born, French national.

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French and Belgian investigators had since been working together after finding that a car used by attackers at Bataclan was rented by Abdeslam. Three men from the car rental company were already arrested for further questioning. The FBI and the US Justice Department attorneys had also helped with the investigation.

More than 103 victims were already identified, leaving 26 as yet unnamed. A separate report from France 24 identified British Nick Alexander as one of the victims at the Bataclan concert hall. He was the merchandise manager for the Eagles of Death Metal who were playing at the hall during the attack. California State University confirmed its student, identified as Nohemi Gonzalez, a holder of Mexican-U.S. citizenship, died in the Paris attacks. Another name that surfaced is Michelle Gil Jaimez, holder of Mexican-Spanish citizenship. Two Tunisian sisters, two Portuguese nationals, two Algerians, three Belgians, two Chileans, two Romanians, a Spaniard and one Moroccan were among those who were already identified. French victims were Mathieu Hoche, music reporter Guillaume Decherf and Asta Diakite, a cousin of French international footballer Lassana Diarra.

Morning News USA reported that Pope Francis condemned the Paris attacks and called them a part of a disorganized World War 3 served in piecemeal. Meanwhile world leaders from the U.S., Russia, Britain, France, Iran and Saudi Arabia signed a statement on Saturday where they agree to a January 1 deadline for talks to start between the Syrian government and the opposition. The talks hope to achieve a ceasefire by May 14.