No More Valentine’s Day for Public School in Minnesota

No More Valentine’s Day for Public School in Minnesota
School Supplies Steven Depolo / Flickr CC BY 2.0
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Cupids, bows and everything about Valentine’s will not make it into a Minnesota elementary school in an effort to manage its ethnically diverse student population better. According to the schools’ principal, the celebration will not happen until they have looked into how dominant view affects or suppresses all other views.


According to Fox News, Bruce Vento Elementary School, in St. Paul, also decided for the meantime to stop celebrating Valentine’s Day together with Thanksgiving and Christmas as they are considered “dominant holidays.” “I have come to the difficult decision to discontinue the celebration of the dominant holidays until we can come to a better understanding of how the dominant view will suppress someone else’s view,” wrote Bruce Vento Elementary School’s Principal Scott Masini via Star Tribune. “One of the concerns that I have,” added Masini, “… is whether or not this practice is encroaching on the educational opportunities of others and threatening the culture of tolerance and respect for all,” he explained further. The principal acknowledged that he knows the decision will not settle rightly with some members of the school but the school will be eager to discuss the matter with concerned parties.

St. Paul schools later on released statement on the matter: “Because Saint Paul Public Schools is a diverse district that is filled with families from around the world we strive to respect all cultures and all students. We recognize that not every student celebrates or participates in some or all holidays. We have a board policy that discourages programs and festivities that celebrate observances unless they are required by law.”

Masini also clarified that no treats or cards will be present at the school during the said holiday. Masini’s letter, which was posted on an invitation-only Facebook page, drew mixed concerns. Some were calling it “totally ridiculous” while others were agreeable saying that Masini’s decision was sensitive to children who do not hold the same religious beliefs or practice the same traditions.

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