Musi and Musi Pro: Your Official Excuse For Not Cleaning Your Room – It Plays Music!

Musi and Musi Pro: Your Official Excuse For Not Cleaning Your Room – It Plays Music!
Photo Credit: Jim Larrison via Compfight cc

Of course what week is complete without introducing a new app or device. Nowadays, a week starts and ends with at least a new product introduced into the public. This day we have the device called Musi.


Musi claims to turn the crap you left on your messy room’s floor into electric symphonies. What? Digital Trends reports that the latest app to grace the public is a device that turns object around it into rhythmic melodies. Looks like a perfect way to escape cleaning up your room everyday!

The device which was designed by Interaction designer Ernest Warzocha functions through an octave reading system which wraps the device in an octagonal octave. The device can lower or raise the pitch depending on the distance of the objects that the user has laid around it.

The closer the objects are, the lower the pitch becomes and vice versa. The sensors on each side of the object gets activated once the device is turned on. The sensors then sparks off a melody that is based on the objects that are laid out around it.

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Warzocha who created the said device is a recent graduate of Poland’s School of Form, where he studied communication design. The device is part of his graduation work which has two versions. Musi Pro is the second version.

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According to his post in Bēhance, both of these devices were inspired by creative learning techniques and projects like an analog game designed to teach kids how to code, which is called Cubetto. The child-oriented design has found its way into his Musi Pro, which focuses more on the musical aspects of the device.

The Pro version can also be used as a MIDI controller together with music production software while the original version can only simply interact with its environment in one basic setting. Additionally, the Pro variant enables the user to change the BPM, sensor range and the note length. They can also reverse the notes order and create chords by connecting a few sub-modules to the main module.

Additionally, Warzocha concludes his post saying that “the main goal of Musi is awareness of sound composition by abstract music learning and physical manifestation of melody. It’s an instrument for everyone – from creative toy for children, interactive installation to experimental instrument which can be used along with any music production software. In any context project gives satisfying results. Another interesting concept is interactive activity for blind people – to explore space by its sound.”

The device, though it doesn’t look like it has practical uses for now, can prove to be useful in the future. We leave that up to your imagination.

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