Microsoft Sues US Government; Another Privacy Issue?

Microsoft Sues US Government; Another Privacy Issue?
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These days all we hear about is the government trying to get private information out of user’s devices which the smartphone manufacturers don’t approve of. On one hand where the companies want to protect users’ privacy, the government wants to use the data to investigate crimes. Though brands are trying their best, the cases of government hacking your phones have come to light. After Apple-FBI, it is now Microsoft vs US governement.


We have recently witnessed the war between Apple and FBI. The security and intelligence service has also confessed of breaking iPhone 5C after which the team also declined sharing details about the hack with Apple, in order to stop the iPhone maker from fixing the flaw. The news is also that the Canadian Police had a key to Blackberry’s encryption since 2010 which was used to break into over 1 million messages sent via BBM between the period of 2010 and 2012. Between all these stories comes another government versus brand battle. Microsoft has sued the US government over “secret demands for customer data,” reports say.

In a blog post, Microsoft informed its customers that the company has filed a lawsuit against the government of the United States in federal court. The reason? “to stand up for what we believe are our customers’ constitutional and fundamental rights – rights that help protect privacy and promote free expression,” wrote Brad Smith, President and Chief Legal Officer, Microsoft in the blog post. Shedding more light on why the action was required against the Justice Department, Brad Smith while blaming the government said,

“The urgency for action is clear and growing. Over the past 18 months, the U.S. government has required that we maintain secrecy regarding 2,576 legal demands, effectively silencing Microsoft from speaking to customers about warrants or other legal process seeking their data. Notably and even surprisingly, 1,752 of these secrecy orders, or 68 percent of the total, contained no fixed end date at all. This means that we effectively are prohibited forever from telling our customers that the government has obtained their data.”

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Hopefully, the right action taken at the right time will stop the government’s interference in everyone’s personal lives.

Also Read: DNA Data Storage: Data Storage Centers in Sugar Cube Sizes

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