MH370 Debris Confirmed, New Theory Emerges

MH370 Debris Confirmed, New Theory Emerges
#SamaSamaMH370 Sham Hardy / Flickr CC BY-SA 2.0
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The flaperon on Reunion Island discovered on July 29 belonged to the missing MH370, French investigators confirmed on Thursday. After forensic analysis, the investigators were able to match a serial number found on the debris to that of parts of other Boeing 777 manufactured for Malaysia Airlines.


NBC News reported that a technician from Airbus Defense and Space in Spain made the verification. In lieu of the confirmation made by the technician, “it is now possible to state with certainty that the flaperon found on July 29, 2015 corresponds to the flight MH370.” With this, the authorities are now in possession of the first confirmed debris of the missing plane after it disappeared on March 8, 2014.

The confirmation is followed by a call from Malaysian Transport Minister Datuk Seri Liow Tiong Lai for the French investigating body to conduct further analysis of the flaperon. The transpost minister believed that the wing plane could be analyzed thoroughly in order to gather more of the plane’s wreckage.

“Such information will assist the Search Strategy Working Group which is conducting the search, to move forward,” the transport minister was quoted as saying by The Strait Times.

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Meanwhile, a team at the Helmholtz Center for Ocean Research in Kiel made the assumption that investigators looking for the missing MH370 may have been looking in the wrong place. The team made the assumption following confirmation that the flaperon in the Reunion Island indeed belong to the missing plane.

“Our results show that the current focus of the search south-west of Australia may be too far south,” Jonathan Durgadoo, one of the researchers, told The Telegraph. The team is now suggesting that the aircraft may have crashed more than 2,000 miles north of the identified search area by the Australian Transport Safety Bureau.

The team of German scientists said that MH370 may have crashed some 200 square miles off the south coast of Java. The investigating team is now urging for the Australian-led investigating team to consider their theory. “Finding more pieces of MH370 debris would be necessary in order to make more precise statements,” according to Prof Arne Biastock, one of the German researchers.

Also read: Debris Not From MH370, Relatives Believe Photos Staged To End Search For Missing Plane

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