Manny Pacquiao To End Boxing Career On April 9, Will Join Politics

Manny Pacquiao To End Boxing Career On April 9, Will Join Politics
Photo Credit: slightlyNSFW via Compfight cc
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Google+
Share on LinkedIn
Pin to Pinterest
Share on StumbleUpon
What's This?

Manny Pacquiao is set to hang up the gloves following his final bout on April 9. According to promoter Bob Arum, Pacquiao intends to retire to a life of politics in his home country.


Pacquiao’s final opponent is yet to be revealed. According to SB Nation, the potential opponents include Juan Manuel Marquez, Terence Crawford, Amir Khan, Paulie Malignaggi and Ruslan Provodnikov. Bradley, Manny’s oldest rival, is being considered the frontrunner because of their history together. They share a victory apiece, Bradley won in 2012 while Manny won in 2014.

The Pac-Man (57-6-2, 38 KO) will be 37 when he fights in April, following an 11-month rehabilitation period after surgery on his right shoulder. Pacquiao’s last fight against Floyd Mayweather was the most lucrative in the history of professional boxing, drawing a record 4.4 million PPV buys. The fight, which broke records in the U.S. with $410 million in revenue, was witnessed by nearly half of Philippines’ households, making Pacquiao a bigger icon than he already was in his home nation.

Pacquiao earned approximated $180 million from the Mayweather bout.

Like us on Facebook

“I’m telling you what he told me last week at dinner in New York,” said Arum, who dined with Pacquiao in New York last week. “We talked very seriously, and he said, ‘Bob, hopefully, by the middle of May I will have been elected senator in the Philippines, and at that point I cannot engage in boxing because I need to focus on the senate and I have to be in attendance.’

“Manny told me this fight on April 9 will be his last fight.”

Pacquiao, who serves as a congressman for his Sarangani province, will contest for one of 24 national senate seats. “There are hundreds of congressmen, but if he wins the senate seat he has to be there to do the work,” said Arum. “They do the real work in the senate in the Philippines, not just make a lot of bulls— speeches like they do in the congress. It’s a real job, and if Manny is serious about wanting to be president, these six years in the senate would be like an audition and for him to show his people that he really is a serious politician.”

With Mayweather also slated to retire by next year, a prominent era in boxing is drawing to a close.