How Eminem Helped Ed Sheeran Overcome His Stuttering

How Eminem Helped Ed Sheeran Overcome His Stuttering
Ed Sheeran Eva Rinaldi / Flickr CC BY-SA 2.0

Ed Sheeran doesn’t care about what bullies think of him.


During American Institute for Stuttering’s Freeing Voices Changing Lives Benefit Gala held on Monday, he told The Hollywood Reporter that being different actually makes someone very interesting.

“Most of the people I knew that were normal in school are all pretty dull right now — they go to the gym four times a week and look at themselves in the mirror a lot, but they don’t really have a lot to say.… Most of the people that are successful started life off as a weird kid with no friends.”

The “Thinking Out Loud” singer was honored during the fundraiser in New York due to his capability to overcome a stutter during his childhood.

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“Into The Woods” actress Emily Blunt, who also graced the event, was able to overcome hers when a teacher suggested she try to be part of a play in school.

“It can be mistaken for a learning disability, an anxious sensibility or a weakness,” Blunt said.

During his speech, Ed Sheeran admitted that he was a weird child who had a “port-wine stain birthmark” on his face.

Then came the revelation. It was Eminem who helped him overcome his speech disorder.

“My Uncle Jim told my dad that Eminem was the next Bob Dylan — it’s pretty similar, it’s all just storytelling — so my dad bought me The Marshall Mathers LP when I was nine years old, not knowing what was on it. I learned every word of it, back to front, by the time I was ten. He raps very fast and melodically and percussively, and it helped me get rid of the stutter.”

He concluded his speech by telling everyone to embrace his or her weirdness, and that stutters shouldn’t see themselves as people with issues.

Recently, Sheeran surprised a fan who he heard singing his song “Thinking Out Loud” in a mall in Edmonton, Canada.

The fan, Sydney, told the Edmonton Journal, “I was like, should I stop? I didn’t want to stop, but I wanted to talk to him.

“This is, like, the best thing that’s ever happened to me.”