Hawaii, SoCal Was On Tsunami Alert After Chile Quake

Hawaii, SoCal Was On Tsunami Alert After Chile Quake
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The National Tsunami Warning Center issued a tsunami advisory on Thursday in the area from San Onofre State Beach in San Clemente, about 55 miles north of San Diego, to Ragged Point, about 50 miles north of San Luis Obispo. The NOAA-NWS pacific Tsunami Warning Center had also issued tsunami advisory for Hawaii. Both advisory were issued in the wakes of the Chile quake where one million people were evacuated.


As of Sept 18, 3:19:25 a.m. the tsunami advisory was thankfully cancelled for the coastal areas of California from San Onofre State Beach, California, 45 miles of SE of L.A., to Ragged Point, 50 miles NW of San Luis Obispo.

On Thursday, the earthquake in Chile sent fluctuating tides on the Southern California coast. There had been tides reaching up to a foot, the Los Angeles Times reported. The Ventura County’s coastline had tides of up to 13 inches and the water off Santa Monica had risen about 6 inches. Seal Beach waves rose to as much as 0.8 feet.

While the tsunami alert was still in place, the Orange County Sheriff’s Department closed all beaches, harbors and marinas, the Los Angeles Times reported. The same goes for the Ventura County Sheriff’s Department, urging for residents and mariners to observe “extra caution.”

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NBC San Diego also reported Thursday that waves in San Diego County rose to 4 to 8 inches. Coast Guard Petty Officer Adrian Diaz noted there had been strong currents and tides of about a foot. He however said that such tides are normal during this time of year.

Nevertheless, NBC 7 Meteorologist Dagmar Midcap still warned that stringer currents might just be hidden underneath the water. “It will be very difficult to actually spot any of these waves. The biggest danger by far will be swimmers, to surfers and especially to divers.”

In Hawaii, NOAA-NWS warned the authorities that “based on all available data a tsunami may have been generated by this (Chile) earthquake that could be destructive on coastal areas even far from the epicenter.” In a message sent to Hawaii authorities, NOAA said, “an investigation is underway to determine if there is a tsunami threat to Hawaii. If tsunami waves impact Hawaii, the estimated earliest arrival of the first tsunami wave is: 03:11 am HST Thu 17 Sep 2015.”

NOAA defines tsunami advisories as warning that “a tsunami capable of producing strong currents or waves dangerous to persons in or very near the water is expected or is already occurring. Areas in the advisory should not expect widespread inundation. Tsunamis are a series of waves dangerous many hours after initial arrival time. The first wave may not be the largest.”

Also read: Chile Earthquake: 11 Killed, 1 Million Forced To Evacuate Coastal Areas, Billions In Damage Caused

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