Google Express Rolls Out Fresh-Grocery Delivery In LA & SF

Google Express Rolls Out Fresh-Grocery Delivery In LA & SF
Photo Credit: stshank via Compfight cc

Google is expanding one of its offered services again. This time, the service involved is Google Express, its same-day delivery service.  The service will now include delivering groceries – fresh produce, meat, eggs and other perishable goods and it will start in parts of San Francisco and Los Angeles, reports The Wall Street Journal.


With the expansion of the said service, the tech giant will be partnering with more shops to provide the goods for its delivery service. Reportedly, the search engine giant is partnering with Whole Foods, Costco, and Nob Hill Foods among others to provide the goods. Aside from delivering fresh goods, the tech giant also handles frozen products and booze, reports Tech Crunch.

To entice consumers to become a member of its latest service, it is offering a $2.99 USD order fee for every Google Express member who orders from the service, which costs $4.99 USD for non-members. Customers can also choose to become a member for a year for just $95 USD.

The fee is said to be comparable to that of its competitors and it seems like the American tech firm is set to fight head on with them. Currently, Google has Inc., Instacart Inc., Safeway Inc., and Fresh Direct LLC as some of its biggest competitor.

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Google said that right now, it has been making small changes to its current delivery operation in order to pull off the “fresh groceries delivery” that it is now offering. One of the changes so far is reducing customers’ delivery window from four hours to two hours. It is also increasing the minimum grocery size from $15 USD to $35 USD.

Google Express originally offers goods and stuff from stores like Target, Staples, Office Depot, Walgreens, Toys R Us, Barnes & Noble etc. Currently, the same day service for “non-fresh” products is also available in San Jose, Manhattan, Chicago, Boston, and Washington.

The launching of the service in San Francisco seems to be just a small rollout of a series of tests which, if proven successful, will soon start launching in other areas as well.