‘The Flash’ Supersonic Punch: Physicist Says Humans Can Damage Solid Metal Head

‘The Flash’ Supersonic Punch: Physicist Says Humans Can Damage Solid Metal Head
Barry Allen from The Flash / Facebook

For fans of the sci-fi series hit “The Flash,” Barry Allen’s trademark supersonic punch is beyond incredible, but is it actually possible? Once physicist says yes.


Using principles in physics, University of Minnesota Physics Professor James Kakalios explained to Tech Insider that Allen’s supersonic punch is doable by humans without effects.

Flash’s supersonic punch has become one of his greatest skills in fighting foes, including Girder, his longtime nemesis since childhood. It’s the first time that the Flash’s out-of-this world punch will be put to test and explained using scientific principles, including Newton’s laws.

To make sense of the supersonic punch, Kakalios said that humans are capable of delivering such high-speed blow at the speed of sound, but it doesn’t come without consequences.

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“Say he hits Girder in 1/10th of a second,” Kakalios explained. “That’s about 2,000 newtons, about 450 lbs of force — so he’s hitting him with a force equivalent to 450 lbs. and does it in 1/10th of a second. That 450 lbs of force is going to leave a mark.”

To put it into context, it’s like being punched on the face by two greyhound buses with all forced squeezed in the size of a wrist, the report illustrated. That’s a punch that’s going to leave a permanent mark, a damaging one at that.

But here’s the catch. Kakalios used Newton’s third law, which states that in every action, there’s an equivalent or opposite reaction. So it means that it is not only Grider who’s going to need days to recover, but The Flash himself as well. Kakalios stressed that if indeed a human can do such an act, it’s not going to be easy for both puncher and the one on the receiving end. At least, that’s what science says.

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