Facebook Nudity Policy

Facebook Nudity Policy
Photo Credit: acidpix via Compfight cc

Controversies, legal battles and Facebook go together these days. This time, the legal battle hasn’t been started yet, but could happen. The new controversy is about Facebook’s posting policy.


The latest issue that involves the social media network came out after a French court has passed its ruling that a French art teacher can sue after his Facebook account has been suspended. The Economic Time reports that although the social media has not explained why his account was suspended, one could only speculate that his action of posting an image of a classical painting that depicts a female genitalia.

Fairmont Sentinel also reported, that the man in question is 57 year old Frederic Durand-Baissas. Durand Baissas, who is also an art lover, posted a photo of The Origin of the World 1866 painting by Gustave Courbet, which he speculates is the reason for his accounts deactivation. He wants his account reactivated and is asking for a compensation of €20,000 EUR or $22,550 USD for damages.

According to Durand-Baissas, he is glad that he is given the chance to get some sort of explanation from the social media giant. He even said on a phone interview with The Associated Press that “this is a case of free speech and censorship on a social network. If the tech company can’t see the difference between an artistic masterpiece and a pornographic image, in France we can.”

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Facebook’s rules on nudity have evolved over time. The latest update happened last year in March. The rules now say that the social media restricts the photos of genitals or fully exposed buttocks, and images of breasts that includes the nipple. However, the American company allows photos of women actively engaging or showing breast with post-mastectomy scarring, reports The Guardian.

However, Facebook reassures users that it will always allow photos of women actively in breastfeeding or showing breasts with post-mastectomy scarring; Pictures of paintings, sculptures and other art that depicts nude figures are also allowed. Meanwhile, as of this writing, it is reported that the social media still has not made a statement regarding the Durand-Baissas account suspension.

Additionally, the community posting standards of the American company now also includes policies on hate speech. The post says that it is also removing content that “expresses support for groups that are involved in the violent, criminal, or hateful behavior that are mentioned. Supporting or praising leaders of those organisations or condoning their violent activities is not allowed.”