Facebook Introduces ‘Legacy Contact’ For Departed Members

Facebook Introduces ‘Legacy Contact’ For Departed Members
Image from Flickr by Maria Elena
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Facebook had just introduced a new feature that allows a family member or a friend to manage the account of a loved one who passed away. Members of the social media site can now choose someone to be their “legacy contact.”


A “legacy contact” can post the announcement of a memorial service or any special message on behalf of the deceased loved one after Facebook memorialized the account.

facebook Maria Elena Facebook Introduces ‘Legacy Contact’ For Departed Members
Image from Flickr by Maria Elena


The contact can also respond to new friends’ request from family members and friends even after death. The “legacy contact” may also update the profile picture and cover photo of the deceased member.

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The account owner may also authorize his or her “legacy contact” to download all of the photos, posts and profile information they have shared on Facebook. The contact is not allowed to log in as the deceased member and will not be able to access private messages. Choosing and setting up a “legacy contact” is completely optional.

Facebook currently has a basic memorialized account option that while viewable is not manageable and accessible by anyone.

“By talking to people who have experienced loss, we realized there is more we can do to support those who are grieving and those who want a say in what happens to their account after death,” the Facebook team said in its announcement.

The “legacy contact” feature will first be available in the United States. The company said it is looking forward to introduce the feature to more countries.

Meanwhile, security researcher Laxman Muthiya discovered vulnerability in Facebook that allows anyone with wicked mind to delete entire photo albums from someone else’s account. The vulnerability can practically delete any public photo or album that a page, group or individual has.

Muthiya had fortunately reported his discovery to Facebook. “They were too fast in identifying this issue and there was a fix in place in less than 2 hours from the acknowledgement of the report,” Muthiya wrote in his blog.

Facebook awarded Muthiya with a bounty amounting to $12,500.