EXCLUSIVE: Detox Is Horrifying, Here’s Why

EXCLUSIVE: Detox Is Horrifying, Here’s Why
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Getting clean from substance abuse is several steps ahead toward full recovery. But in most cases, this is not an easy feat. Sometimes, detox can be horrifying.


But nobody openly talks about the horror awaiting those who want to get clean and detoxify from any substances that are commonly abused, including benzodiazepine and other stimulants.

Deciding to quit substance abuse or dependency is in itself the way to go. But according to advocacy website Detox.net, there’s more ways to effectively recover from benzo abuse and addiction.

Horror of Detox

Ayana Lage, Media Relations Associate of Detox.net, told Morning News USA via email that the effective way to total recovery from substance abuse involves a holistic approach. The group compiled personal accounts of individuals and their battle toward recovery, which aimed to educate the public on addiction and its effects.

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Also Read: CDC: Benzodiazepine Overdose Cases On The Rise

“Through these first-person accounts, we hope to make the public aware of how difficult withdrawal can be and to encourage those currently facing the daunting decision to fight addiction,” Lage told Morning News USA.

By closely monitoring individuals and their journey toward getting cleaned from opioids, benzo, and even alcohol, the group has come up with a detailed report. One of the cases they closely monitored reveals how horrifying detox can be.

Substance Abuse in the U.S.

“The next time I withdrew off benzos, I had a seizure. This was at home, not at a detox. Then finally I withdrew off opiates, benzos, barbiturates, and alcohol all at once. I sweated profusely. I shook. I hurt down to the bone. My head felt like it was going to explode,” Lage quoted a patient whose name was withheld.

Also Read: Heroin, Opioid Abuse Rampant In New York, Task Force In Place

A recently published report by the CDC, a longitudinal study from 1999 through 2013, revealed that around 30 percent of the 22,767 prescription abuse-related deaths involved abuse of benzodiazepine. This translates to a total of 6,973 in 2013.

A separate report from the CDC shows that between 2000 and 2014, almost half a million Americans died from a drug overdose. The report added that deaths due to opiates and heroin abuse hit a record-high in 2014, which translates to 14 percent increase from the previous year.

Also Read: FDA Okays First Anti-Opioid Addiction Implant

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