Early Voting Dates By States: Deadlines, Requirements And Facts To Know

Early Voting Dates By States: Deadlines, Requirements And Facts To Know
Donald Trump in Reno, Nevada Darron Birgenheier / Flickr cc
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Voting season in the U.S. is on the roll, and people have already started casting their early votes. As many as 37 states, plus the District of Columbia cumulatively, which makes up for almost two thirds of the states, allow for early voting.


Early voting is the process where the state permits voters to cast their votes prior to Election Day without having to give an excuse. The voter can visit an election official’s office in person or other satellite voting locations (in some states) for early voting.

The time period for early voting usually varies from state to state. It can begin as early as 45 days before Election Day, and in some states, it may start as late as the Friday before the elections. That being said, the average starting time for early voting is a record 22 days prior to the election.

More detailed information on statutes involving early voting can be found in the official website of the National Conference Of The State Legislature.

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The comprehensive early voting calendar per state can be found here.

Early Voting has begun

Early voting for some states has already started. The total number of ballots cast in all reporting jurisdictions for 2016 rounds up to 157,850.

Going after figures, it can be seen that the Democrats lead the Republicans in the U.S. state of Iowa by a whopping 44,435 requests (i.e., 78,135 for Democrats to 33,700 for Republicans) as of Friday, Sept. 29, reports The Huffington Post.

However, the same cannot be said in North Carolina. It is the Republicans who seem to have the upper-hand here with a margin of 5,863 ballot requests (i.e., 35,464 for Republicans to 29,601 for Democrats); as expected, Republicans have always done better in NC compared to IA.

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Maine seems to have a totally different story. The statewide absentee ballot requests here are slightly down for Democrats, and up (by not-too-big a number) for the Republicans. But because the drop-off for the Democrats is greater this time compared to the 2012 elections, it is therefore worth the speculation to see how the Second Congressional District handles the Electoral College votes.

The table here will help you analyze the statistics on ballots returned and ballots requested or sent in all the 34 states.

For more information on early voting, including requirements, deadlines and the process, you will find all the data here.

Also read: Mike Pence, Tim Kaine Debate Full Video Replay – Highlights Of 1st Vice Presidential Debate

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