DOJ To Release Findings Of Missouri Racial Policing

DOJ To Release Findings Of Missouri Racial Policing
Image from Flickr by Chase Carter
Police Brutality Protest Chase Carter DOJ To Release Findings Of Missouri Racial Policing
Image from Flickr by Chase Carter

The Justice Department, investigating racial bias within the police department of Ferguson, Missouri, will be issuing their findings on Wednesday.


According to Reuters, the shooting of 18-year-old African American Michael Brown by a white police officer opened the watershed for protests nationwide that call for credible investigation for the incident.

More than 35,000 pages of police records show 93 percent of all arrests are African Americans, despite accounting for only 67 percent of the population in Ferguson.

During the investigation, the grand jury in St. Louis refused to indict Darren Wilson, the killer of Brown.

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Steps are to be taken to bring in significant changes in the policing operation of Ferguson, despite the federal officials declining to bring civil rights charges against Wilson.

Attorney General Eric H. Holder, Jr. emphasizes that the “wholesale change” in the Ferguson police department was “pretty clear.” He said about a couple weeks ago that he was “confident that people will be satisfied with the results that we announce.”

Benjamin Crump, attorney for Brown’s family, said, “If the report of the Department of Justice findings is accurate, then it will confirm what Michael Brown’s family has believed all along, and that is that the tragic killing of their unarmed teenage son was part of a systemic pattern of policing of African American citizens in Ferguson.”

The Justice Department plans to release evidences it procured regarding the racial bias via e-mails written by the Ferguson police and municipal court officials. An e-mail, written on November 2008, stated that President Obama could not maintain his position for long because, “what black man holds a steady job for four years.”

In the past five years, the civil rights division of the Justice Department has been able to open over 20 investigations of police departments.