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Black Death Plague Pit Found: Child Skeletons Unearthed In Mass Grave, Changes History As We Know It

Black Death Plague Pit Found: Child Skeletons Unearthed In Mass Grave, Changes History As We Know It
Thornton Abbey gatehouse 2 Paul Stainthorp / Flickr cc

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Black Death Plague Pit Found: Child Skeletons Unearthed In Mass Grave, Changes History As We Know It

Archaeologists have unearthed a mass grave containing 27 skeletons of children. This extremely rare discovery suggests that the community was attacked by the worst pandemic in history, the Black Death.

Researchers investigated a 14th century monastery hospital site in Lincolnshire. Here, archaeologists from the University of Sheffield began studying the Thornton Abbey site. This is one of the biggest medieval abbeys in the country. In the process, they found a grave containing 48 skeletons, 27 of them belonging to children.

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Black Death Plague was the worst pandemics in human history

According to Express, the Black Death devastated the European population from 1346 to 1353 and caused the deaths of 75 to 200 million, as estimated. The presence of large burial site suggests that the Black Death seriously affected the local community. As a result, residents were not able to cope with the number of people who died.

Dr. Hugh Willmott is the director of the excavation since 2011. He is from the Department of Archaeology from the University of Sheffield. He explained that the finding is of national importance. According to his statement, half of England’s population perished during the Black Death. Furthermore, Willmott believes that local communities continued to dispose loved ones in such manner.

Yersinia Pestis was the Bacterium responsible for Black Death Plague

A report from The Guardian said that carbon dating revealed that the site dated back to 14th century when Black Death occurred. Moreover, teeth samples were sent for DNA tests to Canada.

Yersinia Pestis, the bacterium responsible for the Plague, was discovered via tests. Also, Yesrsinia Pestis was identified in two sites from 14th century, both in London, where new emergency burial grounds were opened to cope with the extremely large number of urban deaths.

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