Associated Press Denies Historian’s Claim It Worked With Hitler

Associated Press Denies Historian’s Claim It Worked With Hitler
Associated Press sweets Sarah Marshall/Flickr CC by 2.0
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The Associated Press (AP) denied claims that it collaborated with the Nazi regime before and during the Second World War, the news agency said in a statement.


This statement from AP came after Harriet Scharnberg, a historian from the Martin Luther University, published a study in the Studies in Contemporary History claiming that AP had entered into a mutually beneficial agreement between the Nazi regime in its reportage of Adolf Hitler’s reign.

But in an official statement emailed to the Morning News USA, Paul Colford AP’s Vice President and Director of Media Relations, vehemently denied Scharnberg’s claims saying the company did not collaborate with Hitler at any time.

“Rather, the AP was subjected to pressure from the Nazi regime from the period of Hitler’s coming to power in 1933 until the AP’s expulsion from Germany in 1941. AP staff resisted the pressure while doing its best to gather accurate, vital and objective news for the world in a dark and dangerous time,” Colford said.

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He said Scharnberg approached AP about her study, to which AP provided information from its archive. The company even allowed the historian to interview some of its staff who worked for the company during the World War 2 era.

Colford added that AP resisted the pressure imposed by the Nazi regime, while it continuously provide the world with stories and images of the Nazi Germany. As a proof of its commitment in covering Germany under Hitler’s regime, while all international news agency were expelled, its Berlin bureau chief Louis P. Lochner, won a Pulitzer Prize in 1939.

In her study, Scharnberg specifically cited one event where a unit of the Nazi military troupe raided and massacred people from a small town of Lviv in Ukraine in June 1941 as a retaliatory attack to the Soviet Union’s troupe that conducted a mass killing. The historian claimed that instead of reporting the damages that resulted from the days-long killings that the Nazi had carried out in Lviv, AP photojournalist photographed dead prisoners from Lviv as per Hitler’s orders.

Also Read: Hitler Had Tiny ‘Manhood’, Historians Claim

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