Apple Promises iCloud Security Improvement after Celeb Photo Hack

Apple Promises iCloud Security Improvement after Celeb Photo Hack

icloud Apple Promises iCloud Security Improvement after Celeb Photo HackApple Inc reiterates that its iCloud network has never been infiltrated to result to the recent hacking of celebrity photos, which eventually leaked online. In the wake of the scandal that involves a number of Hollywood celebrities and their supposed private nude selfies, the giant technology firm has been firm in denying that hackers were able to breach its iCloud or even its Find My iPhone feature.


In a recent published interview of Apple chief executive Tim Cook with a major daily, he disclosed that based on the company’s investigations so far, there has never been any breach in Apple’s systems that may have led to the hacking incidents. He hinted that the hackers could have used the old-school style that involves guessing passwords or answers to secret security questions. Those hackers may have also sent phishing emails that eventually deceived the victimized celebrities into providing their personal data.

Increasing iCloud security

However, despite the company’s denials, Cook announced that Apple would bolster its security alerts for all iCloud users. He revealed that within two weeks, the technology firm would start sending push notifications and email-based alerts especially if there is any attempt to reset a user’s iCloud password, to restore his/her iCloud data, or even to log in using a new Apple device.

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Currently, Apple sends out emails if an iCloud user resets his/her password or if he/she logs in using an unknown Apple device. But with the new alerts coming, this will change in an effort to increase security measures.

Apple’s responsibility

By the end of his interview, Cook admitted that he thinks that Apple should have further educated their users on the possible dangers of modern hacking. It was not clear if the new alerts to be implemented could have helped prevent the controversial intrusion.

Supposedly, the alleged iCloud hacking incidences happened even after an added security layer was added to the service. More than a year ago, the company started a two-factor authentication process to increase online security.

Presently, Apple sends a code to trusted devices every time a user signs into his/her iCloud account. If access to password, the registered device, or even a 14-digit Recovery Key is lost, the user is permanently locked out of the user Apple ID.