Apple Bows To Taylor Swift

Apple Bows To Taylor Swift
Taylor Swift Eva Rinaldi / Flickr CC BY-SA 2.0

Whoever thought that a simple blog post from one of the most influential music stars of this era can make a tech giant bow to her wants and needs?


That’s exactly what happened to Apple when Taylor Swift posted a blog entry on Sunday, explaining her side on why her latest album, “1989” will not be available on Apple’s music streaming service, Apple Music.

“This is not about me. Thankfully I am on my fifth album and can support myself, my band, crew, and entire management team by playing live shows. This is about the new artist or band that has just released their first single and will not be paid for its success. This is about the young songwriter who just got his or her first cut and thought that the royalties from that would get them out of debt. This is about the producer who works tirelessly to innovate and create, just like the innovators and creators at Apple are pioneering in their field…but will not get paid for a quarter of a year’s worth of plays on his or her songs,” Swift said in her blog post.

She was quick to say that she respected the company and was all for the “beautiful progress” it takes on. But her open letter was not about her and that her words were not “complaints of a spoiled, petulant child.”

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Apple Music offers a three-month free trial for its users, and the three months of free services will also mean no payment for the artists within those three months.

And Swift thought it wasn’t cool.

“Three months is a long time to go unpaid, and it is unfair to ask anyone to work for nothing. I say this with love, reverence, and admiration for everything else Apple has done. I hope that soon I can join them in the progression towards a streaming model that seems fair to those who create this music. I think this could be the platform that gets it right,” she defended.

And within 24 hours after posting her entry that generated at least 69,000 notes in Tumblr, Apple seemed to have been swayed.

A tweet from Eddy Cue, Apple’s senior vice president of internet Software and services, have silenced the uproar.





That is the power of blogging, everyone.