Apple, Android App Producers Not Keen On Windows

Apple, Android App Producers Not Keen On Windows
Jak dopasować menu Start w Windows 10 / Flickr CC BY-ND 2.0
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It seems that Microsoft will have a problem as far as its mobile market is concerned. Even after launching Windows 10 for mobile, the company may not get support in the form of apps as developers seem to be not keen to make apps compatible for the Windows platform.


Microsoft approached prominent companies that make apps for Apple and Android but many are not interested to devote their energy in Windows app development. According to Reuters, this may be due to the sales record of Windows-run phones.

Last year, Windows phones accounted for only 3% of total smartphone sales globally. The Android smartphones had the lion’s share with 81% and Apple phones were at 15%. The major reason why people don’t purchase the Windows phones is that the app market is not advanced.

Microsoft announced last month that it would provide tools to developers to allow them develop good apps for Windows. However, the developers are happy with the response they are getting from the Android and iOS markets, and they are not sure about how the tool will perform.

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The Inquirer reported Sean Orelli saying, “Windows Phone will have to gain a significant share of the market before this becomes something that saves us time and/or money.” Sean is the director of Fuzz Productions.

Candy Crush For Windows

Reuters conducted interviews with more than a dozen developers and it has been found that most of them are not interested. The only interested candidate seems to be The company has ported their popular Candy Crush Saga to Windows from iOS with a few modifications in codes. The app will be automatically installed once someone upgrades to Windows 10.

Jason Thane, general manager of General UI, said, “It can cost 50 percent or more to develop an app on one platform to port it to a new platform.” He added, “So if Microsoft has a way for our customers to do it easily and cheaply, and if there’s no serious performance or functionality impact, I think they’d have a lot of people wanting to do it.”

With more users depending on smartphones rather than computers, it is expected that by 2017, the ratio of mobile-to-PC will be six to one.

Microsoft, though, have spoken about a tool that would turn apps to suit the Windows platform. It is still not possible to comment on how developers will react once the tool is in action.