Aliens Entering Earth Through Door In Sun?

Aliens Entering Earth Through Door In Sun?
Sunup dingbat2005 CC BY 2.0

A picture of a door on the surface of the sun, revealing white light, has sent UFO enthusiasts and alien hunters into frenzy.


The picture of what is being believed to be an “alien megastructure” – captured by NASA’s Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) satellite – is causing many conspiracy theorists to believe that the Sun is a hollow world that is housing aliens. The white line in the picture, taken by YouTube user, TheWatcher252, has prompted alien hunters to believe there is a door on the surface on the sun. (see video below)

Scott Waring, editor of, cited this discovery on his blog, saying, “A giant door opened up on the sun this week, just a little bit, but enough to make a crack across the sun and through the crack shined pure white light of the world inside. It opened up just enough to allow motherships to exit or enter.” Waring also theorized that the “sun is hollow” and that it houses a “massive work 1000 times our own on the inside.”

The Daily Mail reports that this discovery could also prove the Hollow Sun Theory, according to which the sun would eventually shrink, cool and collapse because it is hollow on the inside. Jeffrey Wolynski, who came up with the theory, said that the sun is much younger than the Earth and that all young stars do not have cores. These stars, he said, are hollow and “will gravitationally collapse until the coulomb barrier is reached and the star stabilizes into a solid ball.”

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On the other hand, as reported by, many believe that the sun is being used by aliens to extract energy. This draws parallels with the Dyson Sphere, a megastructure that has been known to embody the star known as KIC 8462852, also known as Tabby’s Star, whose light has been recorded to be dipping in intensity.

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