22-year-old Goldman Sachs Analyst Found Dead After Complaining About Working 100-hour Weeks

22-year-old Goldman Sachs Analyst Found Dead After Complaining About Working 100-hour Weeks
Wall Street Sue Waters / Flickr CC BY-SA 2.0

The case of the death of a young analyst at Goldman Sachs, who complained to his father about working “100 hour weeks” before his dead body was found the next morning, has brought to light the pressure endured by bankers and analysts in aspiring jobs in the U.S. financial industry.


Sarvshreshth Gupta, 22 and a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, began working for Goldman Sachs at their San Francisco office in September 2014. His body was discovered in the car park next to his apartment at 6:40 a.m. on April 17. It is believed that he took his own life after being unable to meet the expectations kept from him despite working exceedingly long hours.

He complained in January about the increased work pressure he faced, which was leaving him devoid of time to engage in other activities.

According to The Huffington Post, Sarvshreshth, working in the bank’s telecom, media and technology group, resigned a month before his death. Being asked to reconsider, he took his job back on a reduced schedule. He also attended sessions with Goldman’s employee assistance counselors about coping with work stress and striking a balance between work and life. However, with the firm’s deal business expanding, his schedule became as busy as before; consequently, 100-hour weeks became regular.

Like us on Facebook

He complained to his father, Sunil, saying, “This job is not for me. Too much work and too little time.”

Sunil wrote about the ordeal of his son in a post on Medium.

He wrote, “[Sarvshreshth] calls us and says, ‘It is too much. I have not slept for two days, have a client meeting tomorrow morning, have to complete a presentation, my VP is annoyed and I am working alone in my office’.

“I got furious. ‘Take 15 days leave and come home,’ I said. He quipped, ‘They will not allow.’ I said, ‘Tell them to consider this as your resignation letter.’ ”

The post has since been removed.

According to The Independent, the company said in a statement, “We are saddened by Sav’s death and feel deeply for his family. We hope that people will respect the family’s expressed desire for privacy during this difficult time.”

Although the company had said in 2013 that its employees weren’t required to work on Saturdays except in special circumstances, the rule did not apply on Sundays.

Last week, a 29-year-old banker at Moelis & Company, fell off a building in Manhattan and died.

Sunil wrote in his post, “The dawn never came in our lives, my sonny boy, never reached his apartment. A monster, a devil in his giant motor vehicle, sniffed the life out of him.

“My son, whose bones, blood and flesh were my very own, was victim of a cruel, momentary lapse of an individual, who too, is surely somebody’s son.

“The San Fransisco police may finally trace him, the law may give him the severest of punishments, but, who will give me my son back?”

You might also be interested in: Boston Terror Suspect Killed By Police Was Planning To Behead Officers