1st Rabies Survivor Sans Vaccine Gives Birth To Bouncing Twins

1st Rabies Survivor Sans Vaccine Gives Birth To Bouncing Twins
Baby gabi menashe/Flickr CC BY 2.0

The first recorded person in the medical history to have survived rabies without a vaccine gave birth to healthy twins.


The Associated Press reported via the Washington Times, that the woman from Wisconsin, who was treated with an experimental medicine, was able to successfully deliver healthy twins at the St. Elizabeth Hospital in Appleton, Wisconsin Saturday.

The woman, identified as Jeanna Giese Frassetto, named her fraternal twins as Carly Ann and Connor Primo on. Jeanna is married to Scott Frassetto in 2014.

In her personal advocacy website, Jeanna recalled how she got bitten by a rabid bat in September 2, 2004. She wrote that it was a typical Sunday church service with her mom at a local church in the Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. A bat then suddenly entered the church and started flying around the churchgoers.

Like us on Facebook

Determined to save her, a medical team of doctors from the Children’s Hospital and the Medical College of Wisconsin has put her in an induced coma on top of the experimental drug. After the miraculous treatment, Jeanna regained consciousness, but lost some motor and cognitive functioning. The report noted that she had to relearn how to speak and walk.

“Our family is very blessed to have these children. We are lucky to have such beautiful babies,” Jeanna said in a statement as quoted by the Fox 11 News.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), rabies is a preventable disease that affects mammals. It is mostly transmitted by wild rabid animals, such as dogs, cats, and bats, among others. This dreaded disease, which affects a person’s central nervous system, can be prevented by anti-rabies shots. In 2013, at least 5,865 reported cases of rabies death were recorded in 49 states and in Puerto Rico, CDC data showed.

Also read:  Pediatric Deaths Recorded As 10 States Battle Flu-like Illnesses – CDC

Want to get updated with the latest health news? Subscribe to our newsletter or follow us on Twitter and Facebook.